4L04 – Materials Manufacturing

Materials Manufacturing Laboratory

Course Information 2016-2017, Terms 1 and 2

Instructor: Room: Phone: Email:
Adrian Kitai JHE A332 24973 kitaia@mcmaster.ca
Xiaogang Li JHE 248 21881 lixiaog@mcmaster.ca
Andre Phillion JHE258 24046 philliab@mcmaster.ca

 

 

TA’s: Room: Phone: Email:
Aluminum Section      
Sam Stambula  JHEA406  28625  stambusm@mcmaster.ca
Kazi Bhadhon  JHE A203C  26585  bhadhokm@mcmaster.ca
Thin-films Section
Siwei Ma  ABB139  27862  mas8@mcmaster.ca
Weiwei Zhao  ABB139  27862 weiweiz@mcmaster.ca
Steel Section
Linfeng Zhou  JHE A206A  27226 zhoul35@mcmaster.ca
 Adam Moniz  JHE A206A  27226 monizab@mcmaster.ca

 

Lectures:
Monday, Thursday, Friday 11:30am.

Term 1 – BSB 120

Term 2 – ABB 163

 Thin-films Section: Adrian Kitai, Fridays at 11:30am

Aluminum Section: Xiaogang Li, Thursdays at 11:30am

Steel Section: Andre Phillion, Tuesdays at 11:30am

NOTE:  ALL STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND THE FIRST ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING ON TUESDAY SEPT 6, 2016 AS WELL AS MANDATORY HF SAFETY TRAINING ON FRIDAY SEPT 9.  BOTH WILL BE HELD IN BSB120.

Labs:
Monday and Wednesday, 2:30 to 5:30, MSE labs. ROOM TO BE ARRANGED BY SECTION INSTRUCTORS.

Each student will be required to take two out of the three sections.  Additional information on each section will be provided by the instructor.  The final grade will be made up on a 50/50 basis from the grades achieved in the two sections.

Description:
A sequence of experiments/tests/assignments based on processing methods used in industry. One lecture, one lab (three hours); both terms
Prerequisite: Registration in the final level of a Materials Engineering Program. Antirequisites: MTLS 4A02, 4L02.


Course Topics:
Thin-films Section:
A set of four laboratory experiments has been developed to enable an understanding of thin film deposition methods and thin film properties. A wide range of thin film techniques is covered including vacuum deposition methods, electroplating, solution coating and sacrificial oxidation.

In addition a set of lectures will focus on vacuum deposition science and technology. Students will be asked to do a report and presentation on a thin film deposition technique and its industrial uses.

Metallurgy of Aluminum Section:
The laboratory builds on second and third year laboratories with physical metallurgy content. It is designed to simulate a typical industrial production route for an Al-based heat-treatable alloy (6xxx series). The processing will involve casting, hot rolling, heat treating, mechanical property testing and metallographic characterization. Each group will be assigned a different alloy from the 6xxx series, whose composition can be found in the Metals Handbooks. The schedule of the laboratory is flexible, and it is left to each group to work out their own priorities with the teaching assistants and technical staff. A series of presentations will be given in the lectures that parallel the laboratory sessions, to illustrate many of the engineering and basic science principles that underpin the laboratory work.

Metallurgy of Steel Section:
This laboratory will examine the most common thermal and thermo-mechanical processing roots for low-carbon, low alloy steels. We will look at the production of steels with ferrite/pearlite microstructure, dual phase steels and steels with martensitic microstructure. Thermomechanical processing to produce fine grained steels will also be examined. The structure-property relationships will be established for each group of steels through the use of extensive mechanical testing, optical metallography and electron microscopy. All groups will work on the same steel. The schedule of the laboratory is flexible, and it is left to each group to work out their own priorities with the teaching assistants and technical staff. A series of presentations will be given in the lectures that parallel the laboratory sessions, to illustrate many of the engineering and basic science principles that underpin the laboratory work.

Course Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should have:

  1. An overall view of key materials processing methods used in industry.
  2. A professional and systematic approach to research and report writing.
  3. Practical experience with the processing methods of thin-films, Al-alloys or low-carbon, low alloy steels.


Disclaimer:
The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term. The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

Policy Reminders:
The Faculty of Engineering is concerned with ensuring an environment that is free of all adverse discrimination. If there is a problem that cannot be resolved by discussion among the persons involved, individual are reminded that they should contact the Department Chair, the Sexual Harassment Office or the Human Rights Consultant, as soon as possible. The Senate Resolution on Course Outlines states that: “students should be reminded that they should read and comply with the “Statement on Academic Ethics and the Senate Resolution on Academic Dishonesty” as found in the Senate Policy Statements distributed at registration and available in the Senate Office.

Academic dishonesty consists of misrepresentation by deception or by other fraudulent means and can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3, located at: http://www.mcmaster.ca/senate/academic/ac_integrity.htm

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

-Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
-Improper collaboration in group work.
-Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.